Posts Posts by: "Kwanghui Lim"

The Amazon Kindle, Apple iPad and other e-readers are fast becoming mainstream and their usability has improved tremendously over the past years. However there is one area in which printed books are still much better: the ability to open multiple books at once. This might not matter if you are reading the latest “50…(Read More)

Last night, we got to order dinner on a wireless touchscreen, actually an iPad in Aluminum body armour. Pretty cool. This was not our first time, but it was a surprise because we were not at some fancy restaurant but instead at a modest place in Chinatown. It just goes to show how widely this…(Read More)

I recently began using a new writing tool, iA writer. It is one of a slew of new programs that are “minimalist” writing tools including Omniwriter and Writeroom. They help you focus on actually writing rather than tinkering with fonts, layouts, hyperlinks, grammar checkers and other distractions. I was led to search for a new…(Read More)

I’m finally getting back to blogging after spending a couple of months traveling then catching up with work. This week I was invited to speak at a “guru forum” of managers and academics who work in information technology. Among the many issues that were discussed, two conflicting trends were identified. On the one hand…(Read More)

Several months ago I wrote about a public forum we organized on the future of book publishing. Our panelists included Piers Pickard (Editorial Director at Lonely Planet), Graeme Connelly (CEO of Melbourne University Bookstore), Nathan Hollier (Manager at Monash University Press), Max Barry (independent author) and Emmett Stinson (Melbourne University lecturer in publishing and communications…(Read More)

There is a growing concern about the value of university education. The main complaint is that it is becoming too expensive. However, Michael Ellsberg goes as far as to suggest we invest not in university education but in “the kids who are dropping out of college to start new businesses”. There are many facets to…(Read More)

I recently uploaded video podcasts for a couple of events organized by Melbourne Business School and IPRIA: Chris Tucci presented last week on “Creative Destruction and Intellectual Property: What’s an Incumbent to Do?” Part 1 covers the key concepts and Part 2 presents examples from his research. Bruno Cassiman and Don O’Sullivan presented…(Read More)

Today I happened to walk by the Occupy Melbourne protest and took some photos. They have set up a tent city next to Melbourne Town Hall. It was refreshing to see people with so much enthusiasm. The protestors seem peaceful and reasonably organized. Just as with Occupy Wall Street, several committees have been formed for…(Read More)

This past weekend was a very busy one for our fellow blogger Andreas Ortmann. He embarked upon a new research program, his most ambitious ever. It is completely ‘blue sky’ exploratory work and is going to cost so much that the Australian Research Council will not fund the project. The review panel also noted that…(Read More)

Electronic distribution is impacting magazine prices. Below is a table of prices for a sample of popular magazines. Data were obtained for printed magazines delivered to your doorstep from magshop.com.au and compared to prices from Zinio, which sells electronic magazines viewable on your  computer, ipad or other device. Annual subscription prices were normalized…(Read More)

While the rest of the world was busy with Apple’s iCloud, I spent the past few weeks working on a large-scale empirical project. In the process I learnt a few things about cloud-based options for statistics and econometrics. The situation has developed quite a bit since Robert Grossman’s earlier post on…(Read More)

Today, Melbourne University along with 8 other University partners and CSIRO launches a new media venture, The Conversation. It will present independent commentary by academics and researchers. The Business+Economy section features my article on “What really went wrong for Borders and Angus & Robertson.” Using publicly available data I explore several explanations for the…(Read More)

Here’s an excellent update on Gene Patents covering the year 2010: http://genepatents.info/2011/02/24/gene-patents-2010-update/. It is written by my student Rachel Goh, a 5th year medical student at the University of Melbourne. She discusses the controversy surrounding the Myriad and Monsanto cases in the US and Europe…(Read More)

Traditional book publishers have been increasingly challenged by e-books and other digital technologies. We decided to organize a public seminar with industry participants to learn about new opportunities in this area. A common theme among our speakers was of the growing fault lines between those who create content and those who distribute it. From…(Read More)

The Chronicle has just published a first person account by ‘Ed Dante’, someone who writes term papers for a living: http://chronicle.com/article/article-content/125329/. It is well worth a look. I don’t support the practice, but it exists. Three things crossed my mind after reading the article. Firstly, there must surely…(Read More)

My colleague Richard Hayes is working on a project to analyze various methodologies that could be used for assessing the benefits of a national broadband network (a companion project exists on the cost side). Richard recently described key aspects of his project on ZdNet’s Twisted Wire program. The main thing I’ve learnt from…(Read More)

My colleague Sven Feldmann presented a talk today on Game Theory in Action. The city council where he lives has been using a very common approach for matching children to kindergartens. The Boston Approach (see here for details) involves asking for a preference ranking and making several rounds of offers. This approach is fraught with…(Read More)

Australia Radio National recently did a radio program on e-books at the Brisbane Writers Festival. Of the 4 panelists, only one actually owned an electronic book reader. A number of benefits were cited of e-books, including convenience of purchase, lower book prices (especially compared to the prices of printed books in Australia), and…(Read More)

Last year David Weston and I wrote a teaching case on how in 2000, NTP sued Research in Motion (makers of the popular BlackBerry device) for infringing its patents that cover the wireless delivery of email (free download from WIPO). Well, NTP is at it again, and has just sued a number of firms including…(Read More)

News from Singapore this week made it all over the internet. A group of five diners were charged S$1224 (AUD1039) for a steamed fish at the new Resorts World casino. They had earlier ordered a different fish (which was presumably less expensive) but the waiter suggested a substitute without identifying the price. The diners…(Read More)

PageLines